Weight Gain and Failed Diets Linked to Loss
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A billion dollar diet industry depends upon your believing that your lack of persistence and inability to follow their guidelines is the reason why you can't take off the pounds and keep them off, according to Brenda Crawford-Clark, LMHC, LMFT. However, the drive to use food to alter you mood often goes deeper than that, according to Crawford-Clark, author ofáBody Sense Balancing Your Weight and Emotions. Trauma from the past and emotions neglected after loss can also be behind the need to eat.
"No matter how much willpower you have, unless you have acknowledged these emotions and done work that actually honors them and allows you to disconnect, they will continue to haunt you.
Something may happen to you today that triggers a similar emotion and in a moment's time you are reacting not only to today, but to your past pain as well. It's as if these emotions have been buried inside your heart, and you keep trying to push them down with food," she said.

However, it also may be anchored to loss that people tend to neglect, such as childhood bullying, being teased or pressured about your weight,
perceiving yourself as an outcast, being betrayed by someone you trust or being the child of an alcoholic or emotionally unstable parent. You also may lose living a carefree childhood if you were in a family with high expectations, or you were a child in a family where expectations were unusually high because your parents were in jobs visible within the community, such as pastors, politicians or counselors. Using food as a means to cope or get away from the intensity of pain can also begin with infertility, miscarriage, adoption, financial problems and disillusionment, she said.

"That's why it makes me angry when people who have weight problems are accused of not having enough willpower or strength to lose the pounds,"
said Crawford-Clark.á "The pounds can come off and weight become less important, but it takes a systematic approach to attack and dismantle those core feelings that are left over from the past. A pill or a promise could never do that."ááá

Watch for our online course that will help you tackle ongoing struggles with your weight and body image. You'll be able to finally identify why diets can't work, and learn what can. The program is written and led by Brenda Crawford-Clark, a therapist with more than 15 years experience in helping people with their weight concerns, from stress eating to eating disorders.
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Brenda Crawford-Clark, LMHC, LMFT, NCC

Author: Body Sense Balancing Your Weight and Emotions 

ęCopyright 2001 Brenda Crawford-Clark